• Mine Closure Planning
    Mine Closure Planning
  • Social & Community Issues
    Social & Community Issues
  • Environmental Risk Assessment
    Environmental Risk Assessment
  • Environmental & Social Impact Assessment
    Environmental & Social Impact Assessment
  • Environmental Management Systems
    Environmental Management Systems
  • Pollution Control
    Pollution Control
  • Environmental Liability
    Environmental Liability
  • Occupational Health & Safety
    Occupational Health & Safety
  • Environmental Monitoring
    Environmental Monitoring
  • Environmental Baseline Studies
    Environmental Baseline Studies
  • Public Health & Safety
    Public Health & Safety
  • Mine Closure Planning
  • Social & Community Issues
  • Environmental Risk Assessment
  • Environmental & Social Impact Assessment
  • Environmental Management Systems
  • Pollution Control
  • Environmental Liability
  • Occupational Health & Safety
  • Environmental Monitoring
  • Environmental Baseline Studies
  • Public Health & Safety

Emerging markets have become a major force in driving development and fighting climate change as 34 countries have initiated banking reforms to expand sustainable lending, according to the first comprehensive Global Progress Report of the Sustainable Banking Network, an IFC-supported organization of banking regulators and associations.

Those 34 countries account for $42.6 trillion in bank assets—more than 85 percent of total bank assets in emerging markets. Some are wealthier than others, but all of them have made progress in advancing sustainable finance. Eight countries—Bangladesh, Brazil, China, Colombia, Indonesia, Mongolia, Nigeria, and Vietnam—have reached an advanced stage, having implemented large-scale reforms and put in place systems for results measurement. These reforms require banks to assess and report on environmental and social risks in their lending operations and put market incentives in place for banks to lend to green projects. 

The report provides practical indicators and tools for countries to apply to their own domestic markets, regardless of their size or stage of development. This is important because it facilitates learning by all members and accelerates the pace of change. It is based on an innovative results-measurement approach that has been agreed by all 34 member countries—a remarkable achievement that is breaking new ground for measuring progress at the global level.  

Emerging-market countries increasingly are learning from one another as they adopt sustainable-finance policies, according to the report. Bangladesh, for example, was one of the first network members to adopt such policies. Its progress prompted Nepal to undertake regional study tours and peer-learning exercises in Bangladesh to formulate its own policies.
To access the report, please visit www.ifc.org/sbnreport